Spring Hazards For Your Pets

 

Spring is soon to arrive and with it new hazards for our furry friends.

Flowers/Plants

Tulips

Hyacinths

Daffodils

Crocuses

Lilies

Lily of the Valley

Foxglove

Azalea

Rhododendron

Yew Bushes

Basically, if it’s an Easter style or spring type potted plant, keep it away from your pet. If you’re uncertain, the ASPCA has a great website that shows toxic and non-toxic plants.

Garden/Outdoor Chemicals

Anything meant to kill a pest is probably toxic to your pet. This would include, but not be limited to things like:

Gopher bait

Rodenticide

Slug bait

Anything you wouldn’t drink/eat, your pet probably shouldn’t, either:

Antifreeze (or any other automotive chemicals)

Fertilizer

Herbicide

Blood/Bone Meal

Cocoa Mulch (or any mulch, as they can be treated with all sorts of chemicals)

Weed Killers

Indoor Hazards

Again, if you wouldn’t eat it/drink it, don’t let your pet:

Absolutely all cleaners (even if they are non-toxic to humans)

Paint

Mineral Spirits/Solvents

Human medications (just a reminder as some people may not take meds except for certain allergy prone times of the year and may forget to keep them in cupboards and away from pets)

Spring is the time for lots of home improvement projects. Don’t underestimate your pet’s curiosity, even if they seem afraid of the area when you’re around. Keep things put away and out of reach or keep the area closed off from your pet. Just because you wouldn’t eat a box of nails, doesn’t mean your pet wouldn’t.

All Easter decorations, especially the little strips of plastic green grass. Ingested by your pet they can cause an obstruction that could lead to death.

Open windows: if you are going to open your windows to let the fresh, spring air in, please make sure you have your screens back on. Pets can jump out windows and be hurt or lost without screens in place, even if you only opened the window a crack. It’s amazing what they can squeeze through.

Human Foods

Alright, so just because you would eat it, doesn’t mean your pet should:

Pork

Chocolate

Sugarless candies which may contain Xylitol

Honestly, if it’s not labeled as food for your pet and your veterinarian hasn’t given you the ok, it’s just safer not to give it to them. It’s better that their begging goes unfulfilled than your pockets get emptied of thousands of dollars in hospitalization fees, or worse, your furry friend dies. The ASPCA has a list of foods not to feed your pet, but it is woefully short.

While this post is not all inclusive, I hope it gives you an idea of things to keep away from your pets and helps you keep them safe as you enjoy the journey with your furry friends.